Undergraduate

 

Art & Ecology Faculty:

Subhankar Banerjee, subhankar@unm.edu
Catherine Harris, cphunm@unm.edu
Jeanette Hart-Mann, hartmann@unm.edu
Szu Han Ho, szho@unm.edu
Andrea Polli, apolli@unm.edu
 

Art & Ecology Undergraduate Curriculum:

Art & Ecology courses encourage students to investigate, question, and expand upon inter-relationships between cultural and natural systems. Our courses place emphasis on methods and tools from many disciplines—including the fine and performing arts, design, the sciences, and activism—to foster collaborative and field-based research and art-making. We view art as an agent of analysis, critique and radical change. We are less bound to traditional media and more to stimulating ideas and new forms of public engagement and aesthetic experience.

Students in the Art & Ecology track should take 141 (Intro), 240 (Inside the Outside), 341 (Intermediate), 444 (Creating Change), 445 (Grant and Proposal Writing), one additional topics 300 or 400-level A&E studio course and/or Land Arts of the American West (LAAW), and 499 (Independent Study/Capstone).

Suggested Undergraduate Core Sequence:

ARTS 141 Introduction to Art & Ecology
ARTS 240 Inside the Outside: Lecture and Research Course
ARTS 341 Intermediate Art & Ecology Studio
ARTS 444 Creating Change
ARTS 445 Grant and Proposal Writing
ARTS 3/4/5 Art & Ecology Studio/Topics (see below)
ARTS 499 Art & Ecology Independent Study (Capstone)

Land Arts of the American West (LAAW) – Full semester 12 credit hour field-based studio:
ARTS 461.001/561.001 LAAW: Research
ARTS 462.001/562.001 LAAW: Field Investigations
ARTS 463.001/563.001 LAAW: Creative Production
ARTS 464.001/564.001 LAAW: Presentation/Dissemination

400/500 Art & Ecology Studio/Topics:
ARTS 441/541 Aesthetics of Sustainability
ARTS 442/542 Sculptural Infrastructure
ARTS 443/543 Computational Sustainability
ARTS 446/546 The Politics of Performance
ARTS 445/545 Text + Image: Graphic Design for Artists
ARTS 389/429/529 Art & Ecology Topics Studio
ARTS 593 Graduate Theory and Practice Seminar

ARTS 141: Introduction to Art and Ecology
This studio course will investigate the relationship between artistic practice and ecological thinking, asking what we mean when we use these terms and where the areas of overlap between them occur. Through lectures, readings, study trips, and projects, we will explore these fields as complex systems of interrelationships between cultural and natural systems.

ARTS 240:: Inside the Outside: A Contemporary Survey of Ecological, Public, and Activist Art
This course will introduce students to ecological practices in art from the 1960s to the present ecological practice of art with lectures and readings.

ARTS 341: Intermediate Art & Ecology Studio
This course builds on the ecological practice of art, emphasizing background research, collaboration, and public interaction. This course can have any subject matter, but has been taught as an investigation of the food system and artists who work with food.

ARTS 444 Creating Change:
Offered with UHON, SUST, LA, CRP, MUS, MA, THEA, IFDM. Creating Change is a team-taught, multi-disciplinary course about how art and design can respond to the difficulties we face globally and locally. As our climate changes, our information systems are compromised, our water supplies dry, our political systems remain in gridlock, and our world becomes paradoxically less connected to our physical existence and environments we ask: what role do artists and creative agents have in envisioning alternative futures? This course embraces practices from both applied and fine art and design to establish a laboratory for creating positive change. In the face of crises, we propose a future that is connected, sustainable, creative, and adaptive. A series of intensive modules led by faculty from the Art & Ecology area will offer students the skills of collaboration, communication, learning through a community process, developing a site-based plan of action, and addressing economic value and sustainability. Students will have the opportunity to travel to existing project sites throughout the region to work closely with practitioners in diverse contexts.

ARTS 440: Grant and Proposal Writing
The Grant and Proposal writing course focuses on the skills necessary for researching, designing and writing effective grant applications and proposals for a variety of art-based solicitations.  Students will shape their ideas for small and large-scale projects into proposals in various formats following the requirements of real-world calls for entry including microfinancing sites.  Students will be expected to actually submit one or more of their proposals to a granting or producing organization.
 
Land Arts of the American West – 12 credit hour field-based studio program with the following courses:

ARTS 461.001/561.001 LAAW: Research
Hart-Mann/Gilbert
Land Arts of the American West: Research course will investigate research methodologies for field-based artists and facilitate the development and implementation of students’ individualized artistic research models through primary source materials, creative processes, and critical reflection.
Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula and majors in Art enrolled in the College of Arts & Sciences may enroll with the permission of the department chairperson.
Corequisite: 462 and 463 and 464 or 562 and 563, and 564
Restriction: permission of instructor.
{Offered upon demand.}

ARTS 462.001/562.001 LAAW: Field Investigations
Hart-Mann/Gilbert
Land Arts of the American West: Field Investigations course will immerse students in on-site field-based studio practice across numerous econiches, human habitation sites, political territories, and cultural manifestations of “Place” in the American Southwest. Students will work individually and collaboratively to investigate these field sites through creative and artistic experiments.
Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula and majors in Art enrolled in the College of Arts & Sciences may enroll with the permission of the department chairperson.
Corequisite: 461 and 463 and 464 or 561 and 563 and 564
Restriction: permission of instructor.
{Offered upon demand.}

ARTS 463.001/563.001 LAAW: Creative Production
Hart-Mann/Gilbert
Land Arts of the American West: Creative Production course will apply field-based, artistic research and practice to the production process of interdisciplinary studio art projects culminating in both experimental and finished art works.
Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula and majors in Art enrolled in the College of Arts & Sciences may enroll with the permission of the department chairperson.
Corequisite: 461 and 462 and 464 or 561 and 562 and 564
Restriction: permission of instructor.
{Offered upon demand.}

ARTS 464.001/564.001 LAAW: Presentation/Dissemination
Hart-Mann/Gilbert
Land Arts of the American West: Presentation/Dissemination course will investigate the context of art through various presentation methodologies, engagement locations, consideration for audience reception, and media dissemination. Students will develop presentation strategies and work collaboratively to prepare a public exhibition.
Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula and majors in Art enrolled in the College of Arts & Sciences may enroll with the permission of the department chairperson. Cur
Corequisite: 461 and 462 and 463 or 561 and 562 and 563
Restriction: permission of instructor.
{Offered upon demand.}
 
ARTS 446/546: Politics of Performance
Szu-Han Ho
In this seminar we will explore the politics of performance: how the presence of bodies in space and time implicates a ‘viewer’ of aesthetic experience; how performance points to communities to come; how performance destabilizes both singularity and collectivity. We will discuss a broad range of works from 20th century avant-garde traditions in theatre, music, and visual art to those of the contemporary moment. We will hear from invited artists, both in person and via skype. Readings will include texts by Antonin Artaud, Bertold Brecht, Agosto Boal, Susan Sontag, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Jacques Ranciére, Judith Butler, Jill Dolan, Fred Moten, José Esteban Muñoz, Jan Verwoert, Diana Taylor, Paul Chan, and others. Students from art studio, art history, and other disciplines are welcome.

ARTS 445/545: Text + Image: Graphic Design for Artists (applied for new course number 445/545)
Szu-Han Ho
This course will address fundamentals of graphic design through a series of conceptually-driven art projects. Historically, there have been clear distinctions between the fields of design and the fine arts, yet the boundaries between the two are becoming increasingly blurred. Many contemporary artists rely on the tools and principles of design in their practices while designers find inspiration and draw strategies from contemporary artists working with text and images. In this course, we will study examples from a variety of sources, and students will develop their own language for using text and image in site-specific installation, print, and online publication.

ARTS 441 / 541: Computational Sustainability
Andrea Polli
An interdisciplinary field course in aesthetically visualizing information from computer science, operations research, and applied mathematics to articulate environmental, economic, and societal needs for sustainability. Hands-on projects, theoretical, and field research. {Offered periodically}

ARTS 442 / 542: Aesthetics of Sustainability Sculptural Infrastructure. (3 )
This course will investigate site-based, low-tech infrastructure as art. We will design and build experimental sculptures to create an aesthetic experience through functional works and to explore challenges to scaling. {Offered periodically}

ARTS 443 / 543: Aesthetics of Sustainable Landscapes. (3 )
This course explores the concept of “landscape” as an intersection of ecological systems, human construction, and aesthetic experience. We will look at modernist landscape design, sustainable systems, and contemporary problems in ecological art practices. {Offered periodically}

 

Selected Topics Courses:

ARTS 389/429/529: Bio Art and Design
Andrea Polli
Bio Art is an art practice where humans work with live tissues, bacteria, living organisms, and life processes. Using scientific processes such as biotechnology (including technologies such as genetic engineering, tissue culture, and cloning) the artworks are produced in laboratories, galleries, or artists’ studios.  In this studio course we will explore shared and new territory between synthetic biology, art and design.  Students will gain a basic background in the tools and techniques of bio art and design including biomimicry and synthetic biology through hands on experiments, research into the work of other artists and designers in the field, cross-disciplinary collaboration and individual and group project development.  

ARTS 389/429/529: Open Source/Open Culture
Andrea Polli
Open Source/Open Culture examines contemporary open source, free software and DIY movements through hands-on projects and/or theoretical research. This class is connected with the university-wide Open Source Learning Community (OSLC) sponsored by the Office of Support for Effective Teaching.  Open source describes practices in production and development that promote access to the end product’s source materials. Some consider open source a philosophy, others consider it a pragmatic methodology. The open source model includes the concept of concurrent yet different agendas and differing approaches in production, in contrast with more centralized models of development such as those typically used in producing commercial software.  A main principle and practice of open source software development is peer production by bartering and collaboration, with the end-product, source-material, “blueprints” and documentation available at no cost to the public. This is applied in various fields of endeavor, from computing to design to biotechnology. (wikipedia)

ARTS/ARTH 389/429/529: International Art Practicum: ISEA2012: Machine Wilderness
Andrea Polli
Through this practicum course, students will participate in and engage with the 18th International Symposium for the Electronic Arts [ISEA2012]: Machine Wilderness [www.isea2012.org]. This symposium will bring over 500 local, national and international professional artists to exhibit and present their work. This course is taught by the symposium’s Artistic Director, and students will have the opportunity to gain first-hand knowledge directly from the symposium organizers and artists, participate in workshops and conference sessions, and respond to the contemporary trends represented in the symposium through writing, media and other art production. (could be tailored to other exhibitions and symposia – i.e. Scavengers and Predators in Fall 2014)

ARTS 389/429/529: CO-EVOLUTION: Art + Biology in the Museum
Szu-Han Ho
Offered with ARTS 429/529.002 and UHON 402.004. As collaboration and communication between fields becomes increasingly prevalent within scientific research as well as artistic practice, there is a greater need for interdisciplinary exchange between biologists, artists, historians, and other researchers to share resources and methods for building collective knowledge. This course aims to bridge the gap between traditionally segregated disciplines, in order to foster the creativity, expansive thinking, and rigorous inquiry necessary to become future leaders in research and practice. “CO- EVOLUTION: Art + Biology in the Museum” consists of a 1-hour seminar each week and a series of three 2-day intensive workshops, to take place throughout the semester. Co-Instuctors Szu-Han Ho (UNM-Art) and Joseph Cook (UNM-Biology), along with a diverse set of guest lecturers including biologists, artists, musicians, designers, and programmers, will present a variety of perspectives in both the arts and sciences on the relationship of form to place. The seminar (Tues/12-12:50pm) will focus on the theme of “Morphology and Geographic Variation.” The workshops, to take place during three times throughout the semester (Fri-Sat/10am-4pm: February 24-25, March 30-31 & April 27-28), will be led by invited artists who are renowned in their field and working at the intersection of science and contemporary art. Students will have the opportunity to work with the Visiting Artists through hands-on workshops to explore various themes in relation to the collections at the Museum of Southwestern Biology, one of the foremost natural history collections in the country. This course is intended for UNM Honors students and advanced undergraduate or graduate students in Art Studio or Biology; instructor permission is required to enroll.

ARTS 429/529: Re-Mix Culture
Szu-Han Ho
In this course we will examine the concept of the remix as a framework for the understanding and production of contemporary culture. In music, the remix can shift a song from one context to another; in visual culture, the concept can be useful for exploring appropriation, collage, hybridity, and fragmentation, as these techniques apply to mass media, “high art,” and everything in between. This course is a joint project of Szu-Han Ho at UNM and Gabriela Durán Barraza at Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez (UACJ). Throughout the semester, students at UNM and UACJ will communicate and collaborate to produce two public performance events involving large-scale video projection: once in Ciudad Juárez and once in Albuquerque. This course involves required travel to Juárez from March 8-13, 2015.



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